The Top 5 Benefits of Private Tutoring

The Top Five Benefits of Private Tutoring

Every parent wants the student in their life to make strong academic progress, but for some reason there’s a societal stigma attached to private tutoring. Both students and parents sometimes see tutoring as the last resort for learners who have fallen behind their peers, like an admission that the student wasn’t smart enough to get by on their own. This attitude not only has adverse consequences for the self-esteem of students who may need a helping hand to pursue their goals, but it also completely misses what private tutoring is all about.

Classroom teachers are busy, and tutors act as a supplement to the learning that takes place in school. Nearly any student can benefit from receiving individualized attention to complement in-school learning, so investing in a tutor doesn’t mean that your student is stupid or that you’ve failed as a parent. Here are five of the best reasons to look for a private instructor:

  1. Private Instruction Allows Students to Learn at Their Preferred Pace

Traditional education is designed to offer something for everyone, generally at the expense of providing an optimal experience for anyone. Some students grasp concepts almost immediately, leaving them bored while the teacher spends a week on a given topic. Others might need a few weeks for the material to click, meaning that their classroom instructor has to move on before they are ready to.

In contrast, a private tutor can introduce fresh concepts as their pupil is ready to receive them. This ensures that study sessions remain engaging without feeling too overwhelming, allowing students to engage with the learning process and develop the self-confidence they’ll need to tackle more difficult subjects in the future.

  1. Tutors Can Teach to a Student’s Preferred Learning Style

All students are capable of learning, but everybody does so in a different way. For instance, visual learners might use infographics to help them understand cell replication or the causes of World War II, while auditory learners might get more out of talking a topic over with their instructor instead. Some kinesthetic learners study best by actively doing something, an approach that the traditional classroom can struggle to accommodate.

There are no rules when it comes to how private study sessions are structured, meaning that students can choose the approach that works best for them. Many instructors can even offer multisensory lessons that are designed to engage students in multiple ways simultaneously. Why force your student to use a generic curriculum when they could be using one designed around their specific needs?

  1. Students Can Build a Personal Rapport with Their Instructor

When one teacher is responsible for 30 or more students, it may be impossible for the instructor to forge a personal relationship with every learner. Furthermore, some students are shy about asking for help in front of their friends, especially during the elementary and middle school years when students are studying fundamental concepts they’ll build upon for the rest of their student lives.

Private instruction takes place in a one-on-one learning environment where the student’s needs always come first. If your student is shy about asking for help, their tutor can create a learning environment where questions are encouraged. If your student is struggling because they find the material dull, their instructor can look for ways to incorporate their interests outside academia to liven things up. For example, sports can be a great way to introduce students to statistical analysis.

  1. Tutoring Can Go Beyond Core Content

While private tutors can certainly review specific concepts such as English literature and the scientific method with their students, they can also delve into broader study skills that can be applied in a variety of classes. For instance, students can learn how to sit down and study for an exam, how to create a plan of attack for a large project, or how to take better notes in class. These skills are vital to student success but generally aren’t taught directly at any level.

Furthermore, a private instructor can share test-taking tips to help students work to their potential. If your student gets test anxiety, their academic coach can share mindfulness tips such as deep breathing exercises and meditative practices to help them concentrate. It’s also possible to leverage many tests against themselves if you get stuck. For example, your student can review how to eliminate incorrect responses on multiple-choice tests or practice showing their work to at least earn partial credit on many math tests.

  1. Tutoring Works

Experts have been studying the efficacy of private tutoring for centuries and the evidence is clear: students who work with a one-on-one instructor tend to earn better grades and get more out of school than those who do not. The specific benefits depend on multiple variables such as a student’s goals, how much tutoring they receive, and so on, but high-achievers and struggling students alike can expect to get something out of it.

Conclusion

Private instruction is a powerful educational tool for students of all ages and ability levels no matter what they’re studying. As such, it is time to remove the stigma attached to it and empower the next generation with the skills and knowledge they’ll need moving forward. Don’t you want to set your student up for success?

About The Main Line Tutor

With over 30 years of experience tutoring high school and college students, our tutors specialize in mathematics and general chemistry. Our founder, Dr. Chesloff, holds a Doctorate in Higher Science Education and has developed an education curriculum that engages the student and enhances their learning and thought process to help raise their scores and improve performance.

We offer nationwide tutoring via video teleconference in PSAT/SAT preparation (math, critical reading, writing), ACT test preparation (Get step by step instructions, mock tests and more so you know exactly what to expect with the real thing), chemistry (General Chemistry (including AP), Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry), algebra I/II, geometry, and trigonometry.

Our Mission is to target the specific needs of our students, college and high school, particularly in the area of standardized test preparation.

Our Tutoring allows for flexible hours 7 days a week nationwide via videoconference.

The Main Line Tutor
We Raise Score & Improve Performance
www.themainlinetutor.com
Tel: (610) 324-8359
e-mail: drchesloff@themainlinetutor.com

10 Terrific Test Taking Tips To Achieve A High SAT Score

10 terrific test tips for a high SAT score
10 terrific test tips for a high SAT score

10 Terrific Test-Taking Tips for a High SAT Score

The Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) is a popular, paper-based entrance exam administered by the College Board since 1926. According to the U.S. News & World Report, around 2.2 million high school students take the SAT test each year. The three-hour exam evaluates college readiness with multiple-choice questions in two sections: critical reading and math. The SAT also has an optional, 50-minute essay section to judge writing skills. High school juniors and seniors can register for SAT test sessions seven times yearly. For 2019-20, the SAT cost ranged from $49.50 to $64.50 based on the chosen format.

Are you planning to take the SAT test? If so, it’s normal to feel anxious. There’s so much pressure to achieve a high mark on the 400-1600 scoring scale. SAT scores are factored into the admission process at most four-year U.S. colleges. The College Board has over 6,000 member institutions globally that accept SAT scores. Superior SAT scores are a necessity to get into top universities like Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Stanford, and Northwestern. Studying at least one month before the SAT exam is key. The SAT isn’t a test to underestimate or cram for overnight. Here are 10 terrific test-taking tips for achieving a high SAT score.

  1. Take Free SAT Practice Tests Online

Finding online SAT practice tests is the best way to learn the lay of the land. Practice tests make you aware of the types of reading and math questions asked. The College Board recommends creating a free Khan Academy account for SAT preparation. Always use a timer when taking SAT practice tests. Budgeting the right amount of time for each section, such as 80 minutes for math, is important. Online mock exams will teach you deductive reasoning and time management skills.

  1. Identify Your Test-Taking Weaknesses

Everyone has their unique weaknesses when taking exams. Don’t feel ashamed when you mess up. Use your mistakes as teachable moments to better your test-taking ability. After you’ve graded a few SAT practice tests, take stock of your frequent errors. Perhaps you struggle with algebra questions. Maybe you’re skimming the reading passages too fast. Whatever the case, hone in on your weak spots. Brainstorm fixes, such as rereading textbook chapters on stumbling subjects.

  1. Master the Art of Educated Guessing

It’s highly unlikely that you’ll know every SAT answer. Sometimes, you’ll simply need to take a stab at it. The College Board doesn’t penalize SAT takers for guessing. There’s no sense in leaving the harder questions blank. You have a 25 percent chance of picking the right response. Your odds increase if you’re able to eliminate one or two wrong answers. Educated guessing is like requesting the 50-50 lifeline on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Using the process of elimination can help you guess correctly.

  1. Have SAT Vocabulary Flashcards Handy

The SAT is notorious for using big words to test students’ vocabularies. Nobody knows which elongated words will be pulled from the dictionary for the SAT reading section. However, you can prepare by studying frequently used SAT words. Print out online vocabulary lists that define these supersized terms, such as “surreptitious” and “aberration.” Make flashcards on index cards to test yourself during free periods. Download mobile vocabulary apps and games to practice on the go.

  1. Exercise Your Mental Math Muscles

Relying on a calculator for every SAT math question is too time-consuming. Plus, there’s one SAT subsection where calculators aren’t allowed. Doing basic math calculations in your head will save you time and work. Leave the paper and pencil for figuring out tougher formulas. Practice doing simple arithmetic like 48 + 8 mentally. Run drills with addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems. Learn mental math tricks, such as rounding up to 10 when multiplying by nine.

  1. Highlight Key Points in the SAT Test Booklet

The College Board forbids the use of highlighters during the SAT test. Nonetheless, your shiny yellow #2 pencil works just as well. Use your pencil to mark the important points of wordy, convoluted SAT questions. Underline parts of the directions that signal what you must do. Circle meaningful parts of reading passages for reference later. Make marks on diagrams, charts, or graphs for math questions. Highlighting relevant info will point you toward the right answers for high SAT scores.

  1. Create a Clear SAT Essay Outline

Have you decided to take the SAT essay section? Then, you’ll be given a brief nonfiction passage and asked to explain the author’s argument. Avoid jumping right to the writing process. Devote 10-15 minutes of the 50-minute session to outlining a cohesive essay. Outlines prevent you from rambling, skipping around, and going off-topic. Map out a strong essay from the introduction to the conclusion. Always link back to the passage with quoted facts. Also, budget enough time for proofreading and making edits.

  1. Brush Up on English Grammar Rules

High SAT scores require a solid understanding of proper English grammar. Nearly 50 percent of the reading section deals with grammatical rules. SAT essays riddled with grammar mistakes won’t perform well either. Ensure you know the right punctuation usage and sentence structure. Refresh your memory with online grammar quizzes and games. Review free internet resources, such as the Purdue Online Writing Lab and Grammar Monster. Editing software like Grammarly can also help check your practice SAT essays.

  1. Go With Your Gut Instinct

SAT takers tend to overthink questions and second-guess their answers. However, your initial inkling is usually correct. Listen to your gut instinct. Be confident in your knowledge and abilities. Stick with your first responses unless you’re 100 percent positive you messed up. Once you mark your answer, move to the next question without looking back. Mulling over your answers will waste precious minutes. Repeatedly changing your mind could hurt your answer sheet too. Stray erasure marks may throw the scoring machine off.

  1. Arrive at the SAT Center Ready and Rested

Once your SAT test day rolls around, it’s time to stop studying. Last-minute studying will only exhaust your mind. Have faith in your many hours of practice. Use the night before and the day of your SAT test to decompress. Get energized with some mild to moderate physical exercise. Whether sketching, swimming, or singing, do your favorite form of stress relief. Feed your stomach and brain healthy, balanced meals. Head to bed early for at least eight solid hours of sleep. Pack your bag with pencils, a charged calculator, a photo ID, and snacks too.

Are you unhappy with your first SAT score? Don’t panic, because retakes are permitted. In 2018, the College Board reported that 63 percent of second-time SAT takers earned a better score. Most students take the SAT exam at least twice to reach their targeted score. Colleges will only weigh your best composite SAT score. Admission committees won’t penalize you for having a less-than-stellar first showing. Use the above 10 terrific test-taking tips to boost your chances of improvement and a high SAT score.

About The Main Line Tutor

With over 30 years of experience tutoring high school and college students our tutors specialize in mathematics and general chemistry. Our founder, Dr. Chesloff, holds a Doctorate in Higher Science Education and has developed an education curriculum that engages the student and enhances their learning and thought process to help raise their scores and improve performance.

We offer nationwide tutoring via video teleconference in PSAT/SAT preparation (math, critical reading, writing), ACT test preparation (Get step by step instructions, mock tests and more so you know exactly what to expect with the real thing), chemistry (General Chemistry (including AP), Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry), algebra I/II, geometry, and trigonometry.

Our Mission is to target the specific needs of our students, college and high school, particularly in the area of standardized test preparation.

Our Tutoring allows for flexible hours 7 days a week nationwide via videoconference.

The Main Line Tutor
We Raise Score & Improve Performance
www.themainlinetutor.com
Tel: (610) 324-8359
e-mail: drchesloff@themainlinetutor.com

Happy Mother’s Day | The Main Line Tutor

Happy Mother’s Day

The best families are built on love, patience, laughter, hugs, and faith…and wonderful Mothers

The Main Line Tutor
We Raise Score & Improve Performance
www.themainlinetutor.com
Tel: (610) 324-8359
e-mail: drchesloff@themainlinetutor.com

Why Should My Student Work with A Private Tutor?

Why Should My Student Work with A Private Tutor?

Whether the student in your life is falling behind their peers academically or simply losing interest in their studies, working with a private tutor could help them pursue their educational goals. A private instructor allows your student to study in a one-on-one learning environment that revolves around their unique needs, helping them make the most out of every session. Here are four reasons why private instruction often proves beneficial:

1. Individualized Attention

When your student completes an assignment for their classroom teacher, they need to wait for the entire class’s work to be reviewed before receiving feedback on how they did. By the time they get their assignment back, the material is no longer at the forefront of their mind. Since they may no longer remember their thought processes while working on it, it could prove challenging to correct any mistakes in a meaningful way.

In contrast, a private instructor has fewer papers to review, allowing your student to receive feedback in a more timely fashion. A tutor can also take the time to go over every question with your student to help them do better next time, a luxury that the average classroom teacher cannot afford.

Private instruction also allows students to learn at their own pace. If they understand the Civil War era already, their study sessions can concentrate on something else to remain as productive as possible. If your student is having a hard time understanding the motivations of the title characters in Romeo and Juliet, their instructor can provide additional explanation until your student is ready to move onto something else.

2. Personalized Study Sessions

While classrooms generally need to follow set curricula, a private tutor can design study sessions around your student’s preferred learning style. If they are a visual learner, their instructor can incorporate visual aids into study sessions. Counting cubes might help a young student grasp the basics of arithmetic, while info-graphics can be a great way to illustrate time lines of events for social studies or the principle players in a novel.

If they are more of a kinesthetic individual who learns best by doing, their instructor can engage them with interactive activities to help them get a feel for the material. They might play a game based on solving math problems, or conduct an experiment at home to illustrate scientific principles.

If your student is an auditory learner, their instructor might use a discussion format to help important information stick. Verbal emphasis and oral repetition are an auditory learner’s best friends, especially for any subject requiring rote memorization.

3. A True Connection

Seeing a teacher for an hour each weekday for 10 months or so is not the best way to forge a meaningful relationship, especially since most students are only one of many in any particular classroom. Most students also change teachers at the beginning of each school year, so time is not on their side.

On the other hand, private instruction provides a more intimate setting where teacher and pupil can take the time to really get to know each other. If your student comes to trust their tutor, they may feel more comfortable asking for assistance before a misunderstanding escalates into a significant learning obstacle. Some shyer students also don’t want to admit that they need help in front of their peers, a problem that ceases to exist in a one-on-one study environment.

A private tutor can also use your student’s interests to make sessions more engaging. If your student has a hard time relating to word problems, their instructor might add the names of friends and family members to make them more interesting. A sports fan might use their favorite team’s statistics to make math more approachable, and reading is always more fun if you get some say in the material you work with.

4. Building Study Skills

While most classroom instructors are bound to a set curriculum within a limited time frame, a tutor offers the flexibility to teach valuable study skills that your student can use at all levels of education. For instance, taking notes as you read forces a more active engagement with the material, potentially improving a student’s retention. A private instructor can help your student quickly identify what’s worthy of jotting down to help them make the most of “active reading.”

Similarly, learning how to outline written assignments can make essays and research papers feel a little less intimidating. Not only does working from an outline make it easier for your student to include all of the supporting details they originally planned to, it also prevents them from staring at the page wondering what to say next. It may seem counter-intuitive to spend valuable time outlining, but it often helps students finish an assignment more quickly.

If your student is preparing for a specific standardized test, they can also review test-specific strategies with their private instructor. For example, there is no penalty for guessing on the ACT or SAT, so test-takers should do everything in their power to at least answer every question. Other exams may penalize students for answering incorrectly, so leaving it blank could be the right strategic decision in certain circumstances. If your student deals with text anxiety, their instructor may also demonstrate meditative techniques to help them calm their nerves and concentrate on the exam in front of them.

Conclusion

The classroom experience is important, but a private tutor can act as a valuable educational supplement to the instruction your student receives in school. Look into a private instructor today to help your student pursue their full academic potential!

About The Main Line Tutor

With over 30 years of experience tutoring high school and college students our tutors specialize in mathematics and general chemistry. Our founder, Dr. Chesloff, holds a Doctorate in Higher Science Education and has developed an education curriculum that engages the student and enhances their learning and thought process to help raise their scores and improve performance.

We offer nationwide tutoring via video teleconference in PSAT/SAT preparation (math, critical reading, writing), ACT test preparation (Get step by step instructions, mock tests and more so you know exactly what to expect with the real thing), chemistry (General Chemistry (including AP), Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry), algebra I/II, geometry, and trigonometry.

Our Mission is to target the specific needs of our students, college and high school, particularly in the area of standardized test preparation.

Our Tutoring allows for flexible hours 7 days a week nationwide via videoconference.

The Main Line Tutor
We Raise Score & Improve Performance
www.themainlinetutor.com
Tel: (610) 324-8359
e-mail: drchesloff@themainlinetutor.com

4 Reasons You Should Have A Tutor While in College

Tutor with student via teleconference The Main Line Tutor nationwide tutoring
Tutor with student via teleconference

4 Reasons You Should Have A Tutor While in College

Having a tutor can help you get good grades in college, which will boost your chances of landing a job after graduation. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, 66% of employers screen applicants by GPA. Furthermore, 58% of employers surveyed said they would be much less likely to hire candidates with less than a 3.0 average. Considering how important maintaining a good GPA is, hiring a tutor can be a helpful financial investment that allows you to gain many benefits along the way.

  1. Access individualized help and cut back on the costs of remedial classes, study guides, and test prep courses.

    Professors can help you during office hours, and classmates can help you during group study sessions, but you might not get the attention you need from them. Professors sometimes work with hundreds of students each semester. They often juggle visitors, phone calls, e-mails, and their own work during office hours. Likewise, study sessions are set up to help the whole group learn. The group can’t always cover what each member needs help with.
    If you need a session focused on helping you understand the course material, a tutor is the way to go. Once you become close to a tutor over several weeks or even semesters, they will better understand how you learn. Then, they will be able to tailor lessons to fit your learning style. Hiring one tutor long-term can save you money when you compare this expense to the high costs of remedial classes, supplemental study guides, and test prep courses.

  2. Boost your grades and improve your odds of winning scholarships.

    Studying hard with your tutor will improve your grades, which is not only great for your future career but can also help you earn scholarships. Remember, many scholarships and grants are available to upperclassmen. Be sure to ask your financial aid office about merit-based scholarships for which you may qualify.

  3. Raise your self-esteem and lift your spirits.

    When you spend hours studying by yourself, it’s easy to get discouraged. If you’re studying a subject that just doesn’t come naturally to you, you may feel like other students have a big advantage. Having a tutor on your side can help you start feeling optimistic again. A good tutor should give you positive, encouraging feedback to keep your spirits up.

  4. Learn at an efficient pace and free up time for a part-time job or internship.

    Again, the problem with seeking help from a professor during office hours or a going to a peer study group is that they may not be able to teach you at your own speed. You might understand some material slowly, while quickly grasping other topics. A tutor can work with you at your pace so that you never feel rushed or bored. These more focused study periods can help you budget your time better, leaving more room for a part-time job or internship to help keep your college debt down.

    You may be wondering if the cost of a tutor might cancel out the long-term financial benefits. Chances are, it won’t. Many schools offer free tutoring at an on-campus tutoring center. Hiring a private tutor can also be inexpensive. Check your school’s bulletin boards and campus newspaper classifieds for ads. You will probably find students at your university who tutor part-time at low rates. If you don’t find what you need, post your own ads seeking a tutor, and don’t be afraid to mention your price limit. Ask around at your academic department, too.

    If you excel at certain subjects, you might even be able to get free tutoring, a big financial plus. At many colleges, students swap tutoring services with each other. For example, say you need help with calculus, but already aced French grammar. You may be able to find a math major struggling through their foreign language requirement and trade favors. If you like this idea, post an ad and see what responses you receive. 

    In short, if you think you could use extra academic help, there are plenty of reasons to seek a tutor today. The time and money you spend now will benefit you later. Remember, working with a tutor can be cheap or even free, and will help you get the most out of your college experience.

    About The Main Line Tutor

    With over 30 years of experience tutoring high school and college students our tutors specialize in mathematics and general chemistry. Our founder, Dr. Chesloff, holds a Doctorate in Higher Science Education and has developed an education curriculum that engages the student and enhances their learning and thought process to help raise their scores and improve performance.

    We offer nationwide tutoring via video teleconference in PSAT/SAT preparation (math, critical reading, writing), ACT test preparation (Get step by step instructions, mock tests and more so you know exactly what to expect with the real thing), as well as in chemistry (General Chemistry (including AP), Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry), algebra I/II, geometry, and trigonometry.

    Our Mission is to target the specific needs of our students, college and high school, particularly in the area of standardized test preparation.

    Our Tutoring allows for flexible hours 7 days a week nationwide via videoconference.

    The Main Line Tutor
    We Raise Score & Improve Performance
    www.themainlinetutor.com
    Tel: (610) 324-8359
    e-mail: drchesloff@themainlinetutor.com

    Should I Take the SAT or the ACT?

    Should I take the SAT or ACT?

    Test Background

    The ACT is operated by, and takes its name from, American College Testing, and first came to the fore in 1959, predominantly in Southern and Midwestern schools. Administered by the College Board, the SAT, on the other hand, was introduced in 1926 and was traditionally the favored test in East and West Coast schools. While many of its takers assume that SAT stands for Scholastic Assessment Test, the acronym no longer has an assigned meaning. Despite the original geographical distinctions, students across the States are free to take either test. In fact, in 2011 the ACT overtook the SAT as the most popular choice for high school students.

    ACT Basics

    The ACT includes four components, English, Mathematics, Reading and Science, with an optional fifth Writing section. In total, the five-section test lasts 3 ½ hours. Although the Writing section is optional, many colleges require candidates to take it. Students can receive a maximum score of 36 in each section, with an overall average taken to obtain the final test score. If a student takes the Writing section, the essay score is incorporated into the average of the English section. Students taking the Writing section complete the essay at the end of the test.

    SAT Basics

    The SAT is divided into Critical Reading, Mathematics, and Writing sections, with the entire test taking 3 hours and 45 minutes. Each section is scored out of 800, for an overall score of 2400. The first item in the test is a 25-minute essay, which is incorporated into the Writing section score, and represents the only part of the test graded holistically. All the other answers are entered on a bubble sheet and graded electronically.

    Significant Differences

    In the English section, the ACT tests knowledge of punctuation, including commas, apostrophes, and colons, while the SAT places a heavier emphasis on usage. The ACT Mathematics section tests knowledge of concepts in trigonometry, Algebra I, II, geometry and standard arithmetic. The SAT, on the other hand, does not include trigonometry. Notoriously, the SAT Critical Reading section includes a significant number of questions that test vocabulary, meaning that students typically prepare by memorizing extended lists of sometimes obscure words, often without grasping their essential meaning. The ACT, by contrast, tests knowledge of vocabulary in context only.

    One of the most common criticisms of the SAT across all sections is that its 140 questions tend to be abstruse and unnecessarily complex. Although the ACT extends to 215 questions, the wording is significantly more straightforward. The greatest difference, however, is that the SAT penalizes wrong answers in an attempt to curb guessing, whereas the ACT awards points only for correct answers.

    Key Changes

    In order to address criticism, the SAT test has changed significantly during recent decades. From spring 2016, the test will undergo a further metamorphosis. No longer will students be required to learn lists of suggested vocabulary; instead, vocabulary questions will focus on context, in the same vein as the ACT. Likewise, the Critical Reading and Writing sections will include data analysis, and students will have to cite evidence from reading passages rather than simply selecting a multiple choice option.

    The Mathematics section will focus on a narrower set of topics and the use of calculators will be prohibited for some sections, unlike the existing SAT where calculators are allowed throughout. Crucially, points will no longer be deducted for incorrect answers. The much-maligned essay will remain, but will be optional, and 50 minutes will be allowed instead of 25.  

    Which Test is for Me?

    Since the ACT is more closely aligned with material on the high school curriculum, it panders to the strength of students who already have a firm grasp of their existing subjects. Because it also tests knowledge of Science, but offers Writing as an option, the ACT also appeals to students whose writing is comparatively weak. This advantage will no longer apply once the 2016 SAT is introduced, however.

    Students who are good at simple test taking, who have a longer attention span, and who have a lower-than-expected GPA will find the SAT comes to the rescue. In theory, a student with a low GPA could ace the SAT on strong reasoning skills alone and somehow compensate for poor performance in subjects tied to Common Core Standards.

    To give themselves the best possible college application, students to take practice tests in both the SAT and ACT, either by taking PSATs or simply by accessing free online practice tests. In the junior year, there is no impediment to taking both tests, and students can then choose which scores to send to colleges. In some cases, the disparity in scores could be significant. 

    About The Main Line Tutor

    With over 30 years of experience tutoring high school and college students our tutors specialize in mathematics and general chemistry. Our founder, Dr. Chesloff, holds a Doctorate in Higher Science Education and has developed an education curriculum that engages the student and enhances their learning and thought process to help raise their scores and improve performance.

    We offer nationwide tutoring via video teleconference in PSAT/SAT preparation (math, critical reading, writing), ACT test preparation (Get step by step instructions, mock tests and more so you know exactly what to expect with the real thing), as well as in chemistry (General Chemistry (including AP), Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry), algebra I/II, geometry, and trigonometry.

    Our Mission is to target the specific needs of our students, college and high school, particularly in the area of standardized test preparation.

    Our Tutoring allows for flexible hours 7 days a week nationwide via videoconference.

    The Main Line Tutor
    We Raise Score & Improve Performance
    www.themainlinetutor.com
    Tel: (610) 324-8359
    e-mail: drchesloff@themainlinetutor.com